The Danger of Swollen Streams

There are several stream crossings along the Kalalau Trail. These water crossings can be a great place to take a break, fill water containers and canteens or even cool off by taking a dip. While most of the time the streams are a blessing, they, like most other things, can have their negative side. During or following a big storm, these streams can swell up and become raging rivers. They aren’t the harmless oasises that they usually are, but rather they become dangerous, sucking torrents of water that can injure or imperil hikers.

The Danger of Swollen Streams
When the Kalalau Trail is closed

On occasion parts of the Kalalau Trail is closed to visitors. Sometimes this is due to trail maintenance or a planned event like it was last summer for the feral goat and pig hunt. When these planned events happen, the Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), Division of State Parks does not issue permits during that time period. This can be disappointing if you were planning a trip for that time period but at least you can find out ahead of time that there are no permits available.

When the Kalalau Trail is closed
17 Camping Hacks

It seems every time that I camp somewhere I decide that there was something that I should have done different to make my trip a little better. I’m sure this happens to most people. That’s why we get to be better and better campers with each trip as our experience widens.

17 Camping Hacks
10 Places that make Crawler’s Ledge look simple

Crawler’s Ledge is one of the most feared parts of the Kalalau Trail. I imagine it has kept many would-be hikers away over the years. I have a slight fear of heights myself but honestly have never found Crawler’s Ledge hard to cross. I think the reasons that it isn’t hard to cross are:

10 Places that make Crawler’s Ledge look simple
Kalalau-Sign-500

The Kalalau Trail is an 11 mile trail that leads from Ke’e Beach to Kalalau Beach along the Na Pali Coast on the island of Kauai in Hawaii. This website has information and media that will help you plan your outing to the secluded Kalalau Beach and/or Kalalau Valley. The Kalalau Trail is part of the Hawaii State Parks system.

The Kalalau Trail provides the only land access to this part of the rugged coast. The trail traverses 5 valleys before ending at Kalalau Beach where it is blocked by sheer, fluted pali. The 11-mile trail is graded but almost never level as it crosses above towering sea cliffs and through lush valleys. The trail drops to sea level at the beaches of Hanakapi’ai and Kalalau.

Kalalau Trial Camping

Camping is only allowed at Hanakoa or Kalalau. Camping is not allowed anywhere else along the trail or at the trail head. Permits are required to camp. As of March 1, 2015, You can hike all the way to Hanakapi’ai and up to Hanakapi’ai Falls as a day hike without a permit.  Permits are required to hike past Hanakapi’ai even if you don’t plan to camp. The authorized camping areas along the trail do not have tables or drinking water. Composting toilets are available at Hanakapi’ai, Hanakoa, and Kalalau. All camping areas are located on shaded terraces near streams.  Visit our Trail Information page to view a map of the trail to help plan your trip.

Kalalau Trail Website

This KalalauTrail.com website is primarily designed to provide general Information about the Kalalau Trail and surrounding areas. You can find information on how to obtain Permits, Health & Safety concerns on the trail, Hunting & Fishing information and Frequently Asked Questions.

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We have an active Facebook Group which can help answer questions about the latest trail conditions.  Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.




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Crawler’s Ledge is one of the most feared parts of the Kalalau Trail. I imagine it has kept many would-be hikers away over the years. I have a slight fear of heights myself but honestly have never found Crawler’s Ledge hard to cross. I think the reasons that it isn’t hard to cross are: